Nutrition

Hydration

Your body needs adequate fluid and electrolytes in order to have any chance of feeling energised. If these needs are not met, then physical and mental fatigue will increase, as will the potential for incidents, accidents and health problems. Hot weather, particularly when or working or being physically active, in the heat puts greater demands……

Read More

Alcohol & Sleep

Alcohol is a depressant that slows the nervous system down. It impacts on the quality of the naturally occurring sleep cycles, and can increase sleep disturbance. Some people will say, “alcohol helps them sleep.” This is true to a point! But it is also counter-productive. The figure below illustrates how alcohol affects sleep (red line).……

Read More

Caffeine & sleep

Caffeine stimulates the central nervous system and can artificially stimulate your senses, which makes you more alert. Peak alertness levels are generally reached 30-60 minutes after consumption. If too much is consumed, or it is consumed too close to bedtime, it can interfere with your ability to sleep by keeping you awake and disrupting naturally……

Read More

Iron levels & fatigue

Iron is a mineral. It is necessary to make haemoglobin (an oxygen carrying molecule) in the blood. If iron is not eaten in adequate amounts in the diet; anaemia, tiredness and fatigue will result. People at greatest risk are pregnant and menstruating women, vegetarians and athletes.  If you think you may be low in blood……

Read More

10 nutrition tips to beat fatigue

Eat breakfast based on breads, cereals low fat dairy and fruit. Pack a lunchbox with snack including at least 2 pieces of fruit. Portion dinner plate correctly with half the plate coloured vegetables, ¼ the plate potato, rice, pasta or bread; and palm size portion of meat. Eat to be comfortably satisfied not full to……

Read More

Mealing timing and fatigue

Our bodies perform best when given a regular supply of food throughout the day rather than one large meal. This means that to start maximising your energy you need to have a good think about when you eat your meals, and how much you have. Once you find a good pattern of eating you will……

Read More

Meal type and fatigue

It is often promoted that foods high in carbohydrate make you drowsy because they increase the uptake of the amino acid tryptophan by the brain. Tryptophan is a chemical that can work together with another important brain chemical called serotonin, to help promote a calming effect and sleepiness. Foods rich in protein, however, increase production……

Read More

Energy requirements & fatigue

Eating too much food will provide more energy than we need for metabolic and activity needs, leaving the extra energy stores as body fat (weight). The greater your body weight, the more chance you are of experiencing fatigue. The graph below shows that, as body weight increases above 86kg for an average height man, and……

Read More

Food quality & fatigue

You are what you repeatedly eat! The food that you eat provides the fuel for your body to do everything it needs to do, every second, of every single day. Your daily energy levels, therefore, are only going to be as good as the fuel you put in your body; your food. For example, a……

Read More

Food quality and quantity

The quality and quantity of food you choose can make a huge difference to body weight. The difference between the two diets on the right is 5700kJ. Someone that eats 5700kJ more than another person will weigh 56 kilograms heavier or would have to walk 5 hours each day to burn this amount of energy……

Read More